Technology and detective work nab speeding riders

Technology and detective work nab speeding riders

A combination of technology and traditional detective work has enabled police officers to catch two motorcyclists who repeatedly flouted Gibraltar’s speed limits.
This comes after new fixed speed cameras became operational in three speeding hotspots last month.
During a two-week grace period, during which warning letters were issued instead of fines, a total of 553 drivers were caught by the system exceeding the speed limit – including 189 motorcyclists.
Although rear number plates cannot be detected on a front facing camera, police have identified speeding motorcyclists through other methods, matching clothing and helmets to footage in order to identify drivers.
By way of example, police yesterday explained how the system has identified particularly serious speeding and driving offences, which have not gone without further investigation.
In one case a male motorcyclist was detected at very high speeds on two separate occasions on a front facing camera – therefore not detecting the rear number plates – within a period of 40 minutes in broad daylight and another instance of speeding within minutes of these two.
He has since been identified and charged with all offences.
In another case a male motorcyclist was again identified by front facing cameras speeding on six separate occasions within a short period of time, including two at very high speeds and one in which he was doing a ‘wheelie’.
He has been reported for six counts of speeding, two counts of dangerous driving at a speed which was considered dangerous to the public, and one count of dangerous driving in a manner which was dangerous to the public.
The speed cameras went live on Monday May 8, and ten people caught speeding were fined, with the maximum speed logged at 68km.

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